Supported Robots

At the time of writing, (2023-11-28), Valetudo supports more than 30 different Robots.
If you’re interested in hardware specifics, teardowns and more, check out Dennis Giese’s Vacuum Robot Overview.

Please note that this list is exhaustive. These are the supported robots.
Robots not on this list are not supported by Valetudo. If your robot is not on this list, it is not supported.

Unless noted otherwise, these robots were all tested by me personally to ensure that:

Being supported means meeting these criteria. Only by fulfilling these conditions can a robot be deemed supported.

Robots that aren’t supported

While Valetudo tries its best to be generic and reuse code wherever possible, since it is not a custom firmware, the backend is basically a few huge chunks of code that are very specific to the respective vendor firmware and cloud architecture they try to emulate.

Supporting any new vendors is thus quite a large task because not only requires it to write large parts of the backend again from scratch but also do the reverse engineering of data formats, authentication, communication and various functionality with no documentation from the vendor available.

It’s a time-consuming process that mostly involves random chance and that can only start once security vulnerabilities leading to system administrator level access on the hardware in question has been found. A similar reverse-engineering process without any documentation that is also quite time-consuming and mostly involves random chance.


Valetudo only runs on the supported robots because security researcher Dennis Giese found ways to root them.

Rooting in this context means taking these locked-down IoT devices, finding and exploiting security flaws in their design and gaining permanent system administrator level access to them to allow for running additional custom software such as Valetudo and modifying the system to make the unclouding possible.

These security flaws are all 0days of which we sometimes need multiple to achieve the rooting.
They’re also specific to one specific vendor’s implementation of something on one specific piece of hardware.

With a public root release, these get burned and usually quickly fixed by the vendors, making finding a working exploit chain for newer models after the release harder or sometimes even impossible.


Therefore, please refrain from asking if something that isn’t on this list is supported.
Please do not ask if someone “tried” it. Please do not state that you would like it if something would be supported.

Without explicitly mentioning this, readers often expect that something not being supported just means that no one has tried it yet, which is more akin to how e.g. running GNU+Linux on some random laptop works.

Thank you for your understanding

Table of Contents

Hint:
You can use Ctrl + F to look for your model of robot.

  1. Xiaomi
    1. V1
    2. 1C
    3. 1T
    4. P2148
    5. Vacuum-Mop P
    6. Vacuum-Mop 2 Ultra
    7. X10 Plus
  2. Dreame
    1. D9
    2. D9 Pro
    3. F9
    4. L10 Pro
    5. Z10 Pro
    6. W10
    7. W10 Pro
    8. L10s Ultra
    9. D10s Pro
    10. D10s Plus
  3. Roborock
    1. S5
    2. S6
    3. S6 Pure
    4. S4
    5. S4 Max
    6. S5 Max
    7. S7
    8. S7 Pro Ultra
    9. Q7 Max
  4. MOVA
    1. Z500
  5. Viomi
    1. V6
    2. SE
  6. Cecotec
    1. Conga 3290
    2. Conga 3790
  7. Proscenic
    1. M6 Pro
  8. Commodore
    1. CVR 200

Xiaomi

Robots sold under the Xiaomi brand are actually made by varying manufacturers.
Don’t assume any compatibility of consumables or other parts as well as rooting instructions.

Xiaomi V1

The Xiaomi V1 is made by Roborock. It is sold as:

Comments

Note:
This robot never received firmware updates that enable persistent maps. This means that it creates a new one on every cleanup.
There are no virtual walls etc. Do not buy this new. There are much better options.

Rooting is pretty easy if your device was manufactured before 2020-03.
In that case, it only requires a Laptop. All warranty seals stay intact.

If your robot is newer than that, full disassembly will be required.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Xiaomi 1C

The Xiaomi 1C is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Comments

Important note:
There are multiple hardware revisions under the same name. Only the dreame.vacuum.mc1808 is currently supported.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

If you only see weird characters on the UART, try 500000 instead of 115200 as the baud rate.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Xiaomi 1T

The Xiaomi 1T is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

On initial root, it might be required to do a factory reset so that the device.conf gets regenerated. Note that that factory reset will also remove Valetudo meaning that you will have to put it back after that.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Xiaomi P2148

The Xiaomi P2148 is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

With its 5.5cm height and 32.3cm diameter, this robot offers a solution for some tricky homes. As it is china exclusive, spare parts may be hard to find in the rest of the world.

On initial root, it might be required to do a factory reset so that the device.conf gets regenerated. Note that that factory reset will also remove Valetudo meaning that you will have to put it back after that.

There is no reset button on this robot. Instead, press and hold the two buttons for

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Xiaomi Vacuum-Mop P

The Vacuum-Mop P is using the Viomi cloud stack but is actually made by 3irobotix.
There are three robots with different IDs under this name, and they’re all 3irobotix CRL-200S inside.
It’s very confusing. If unsure, please ask us first.

These are sold under the names:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Warning:
Unfortunately, there are some unresolved issues with the Mijia STYTJ02YM viomi.vacuum.v8. It is strongly recommended to not attempt to root the v8 variant to avoid the risk of bricking the robot.

Note:
While Valetudo works with their model firmwares, the recommended rooting procedure is to flash these with a Viomi V6 firmware as that has more features.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Xiaomi Vacuum-Mop 2 Ultra

The Xiaomi Vacuum-Mop 2 Ultra is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes (since FW 1167)

Rooting instructions

Xiaomi X10 Plus

The Xiaomi Robot Vacuum X10 Plus is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes

Rooting instructions

Dreame

D9

The Dreame D9 is Dreame’s first ever Lidar-based vacuum robot. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

D9 Pro

The Dreame D9 Pro is sold as:

Comments

Important note:
Dreame never released any firmware updates for this robot.
However, we were able to port the regular D9 firmware to it, which is a huge improvement over the stock D9 Pro experience.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

F9

The Dreame F9 is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

L10 Pro

The Dreame L10 Pro is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes (since FW 1138)

Rooting instructions

Z10 Pro

The Dreame Z10 Pro is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes (since FW 1156)

Rooting instructions

W10

The Dreame W10 is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Due to the design of the dock, it might be difficult to have the robot docked while being connected to its UART. One useful trick to solve that is this: sleep 300 && ./install.sh. With that, you will have a 300s window where you can disconnect the PCB and put it in the dock. The command will keep running.

For some yet unknown reason, installing firmware updates doesn’t work if we try to pre-package Valetudo as we do on other dreames. Because of that, with this robot, you will have to manually install Valetudo after rooting.

For that, follow these steps:

  1. Download the latest matching Valetudo binary: https://github.com/Hypfer/Valetudo/releases/latest/download/valetudo-armv7-lowmem
  2. Copy the binary to the robot the same way you copied the firmware tar file
  3. Move it to /data/valetudo. /data/valetudo should be the binary. It should not be a folder
  4. cp /misc/_root_postboot.sh.tpl /data/_root_postboot.sh
  5. chmod +x /data/valetudo /data/_root_postboot.sh
  6. reboot

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

W10 Pro

The Dreame W10 Pro is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is relatively easy. Usage of the Dreame Breakout PCB is highly recommended. All warranty seals stay intact.

Due to the design of the dock, it might be difficult to have the robot docked while being connected to its UART. One useful trick to solve that is this: sleep 300 && ./install.sh. With that, you will have a 300s window where you can disconnect the PCB and put it in the dock. The command will keep running.

On this robot, the miio cloudKey seems to only bbe stored in secure storage which broke cloud communication with Valetudo. Here’s a one-liner to fix that: mount -o remount,rw /mnt/private && printf "%s" "$(dreame_release.na -c 7 | awk -F' = ' '/MI_KEY/{print $2}')" > "/mnt/private/ULI/factory/key.txt" && mount -o remount,ro /mnt/private

If you’re rooting your W10 Pro, just run that command before setting up Valetudo. A reboot might be required.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes

Rooting instructions

L10s Ultra

The Dreame L10s Ultra is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is relatively easy. Usage of the Dreame Breakout PCB is highly recommended. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes

Rooting instructions

D10s Pro

The Dreame D10s Pro is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is relatively easy. Usage of the Dreame Breakout PCB is highly recommended. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes

Rooting instructions

D10s Plus

The Dreame D10s Plus is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is relatively easy. Usage of the Dreame Breakout PCB is highly recommended. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: aarch64 Secure Boot: yes

Rooting instructions

MOVA

MOVA apparently was a rather short-lived sub-brand(?) of Dreame

MOVA Z500

The MOVA Z500 is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter, the Dreame Breakout PCB and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock

Roborock S5

The Roborock S5 is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Laptop. All warranty seals stay intact.

Note that segment support is only available starting with firmware version 2008 so make sure you’re up-to-date.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S6

The Roborock S6 is sold as:

Comments

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S6 Pure

The Roborock S6 Pure is sold as:

Comments

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S4

The Roborock S4 is sold as:

Comments

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S4 Max

The Roborock S4 Max is sold as:

Comments

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S5 Max

The Roborock S5 Max is sold as:

Comments

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S7

The Roborock S7 is sold as:

Comments

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Warning:
The VibraRise mop module makes disassembly of this robot difficult and easy to mess up especially for newcomers.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock S7 Pro Ultra

The Roborock S7 Pro Ultra is sold as:

Comments

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Roborock Q7 Max

The Roborock Q7 Max is sold as:

Comments

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7-lowmem Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Viomi

Viomi is a brand that uses existing robot designs with a slightly customized cloud.
They’re not a robot manufacturer.

Viomi V6

The Viomi V6 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Viomi SE

The Viomi SE is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Comments

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Cecotec

Conga is a brand that uses existing robot designs with a slightly customized cloud.
They’re not a robot manufacturer.

Conga 3290

The Conga 3290 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Comments

Important note:
Because Congas use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Conga 3790

The Conga 3790 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Comments

Important note:
Because Congas use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Proscenic

Proscenic is a brand that uses existing robot designs with a slightly customized cloud.
They’re not a robot manufacturer.

Proscenic M6 Pro

The Proscenic M6 Pro is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Comments

Important note:
Because Proscenic robots use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Commodore

Someone from Austria seems to have bought the rights to use the long-defunct Commodore brand.
Apparently, the first thing to do with that was to release a line of vacuum robots made by 3irobotix.

Commodore CVR 200

The Commodore CVR 200 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Comments

Important note:
Because Commodore robots use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Details

Valetudo Binary: armv7 Secure Boot: no

Rooting instructions

Valetudo

Cloud replacement for vacuum robots enabling local-only operation

View the Project on GitHub Hypfer/Valetudo

General

Newcomer Guide Why Valetudo? Why not Valetudo? Getting Started Supported Robots Rooting Essentials Buying Supported Robots

Installation

Dreame Roborock

Usage

Implementation Overview Capabilities Overview Upgrading Firmware Updates

Companion Apps

Valetudo Companion (Android) Valetudo Tray Companion Valeronoi Lovelace Valetudo Map Card I Can't Believe It's Not Valetudo node-red-contrib-valetudo Fun & Games Other Noteworthy Projects

Integrations

MQTT Home Assistant Node-RED openHAB

Misc

FAQ Style Guide Troubleshooting

Development

Building and Modifying Valetudo Valetudo core concepts MQTT