Supported Robots

At the time of writing, (2022-11-20), Valetudo supports more than 20 different Robots.
If you’re interested in hardware specifics, teardowns and more, check out Dennis Giese’s Vacuum Robot Overview.

Please note that Vacuum Robots tend to look very similar to each other. Before you make any assumptions, please consider asking in the Telegram Group or on the IRC. You can only brick your robot once.

Unless noted otherwise, you can assume that these robots were tested by us.
HOWEVER if noted otherwise, please be aware that the experience can be bad and not representative for Valetudo.
There may be no one that can help you if something goes wrong. You might even end up with a permanently bricked robot.

Hint:
You can use Ctrl + F to look for your model of robot.
Please make sure to read and understand the information written there.

Table of Contents

  1. Xiaomi
    1. V1
    2. 1C
    3. 1T
    4. P2148
    5. Vacuum-Mop P
  2. Dreame
    1. D9
    2. D9 Pro
    3. F9
    4. L10 Pro
    5. Z10 Pro
    6. W10
  3. Roborock
    1. S5
    2. S6
    3. S6 Pure
    4. S4
    5. S4 Max
    6. S5 Max
    7. S7
  4. MOVA
    1. Z500
  5. Viomi
    1. V6
  6. Cecotec
    1. Conga 3290
    2. Conga 3790
  7. Proscenic
    1. M6 Pro

Xiaomi

Robots sold under the Xiaomi brand are actually made by varying manufacturers.
Don’t assume any compatibility of consumables or other parts as well as rooting instructions.

Xiaomi V1

The Xiaomi V1 is made by Roborock. It is sold as:

Note:
This robot never received firmware updates that enable persistent maps. This means that it creates a new one on every cleanup.
There are no virtual walls etc. Do not buy this new. There are much better options.

Rooting is pretty easy if your device was manufactured before 2020-03.
In that case, it only requires a Laptop. All warranty seals stay intact.

If your robot is newer than that, full disassembly will be required.

Xiaomi 1C

The Xiaomi 1C is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Important note:
There are multiple hardware revisions under the same name. Only the dreame.vacuum.mc1808 is currently supported.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Xiaomi 1T

The Xiaomi 1T is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Xiaomi P2148

The Xiaomi P2148 is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

With its 5.5cm height and 32.3cm diameter, this robot offers a solution for some tricky homes. As it is china exclusive, spare parts may be hard to find in the rest of the world.

On initial root, it might be required to do a factory reset so that the device.conf gets regenerated.

There is no reset button on this robot. Instead, press and hold the two buttons for

Xiaomi Vacuum-Mop P

The Vacuum-Mop P is using the Viomi cloud stack but is actually made by 3irobotix.
There are three robots with different IDs under this name, and they’re all 3irobotix CRL-200S inside.
It’s very confusing. If unsure, please ask us first.

These are sold under the names:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Note:
While Valetudo works with their model firmwares, the recommended rooting procedure is to flash these with a Viomi V6 firmware as that has more features.

Dreame

D9

The Dreame D9 is Dreame’s first ever Lidar-based vacuum robot. It is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

D9 Pro

The Dreame D9 Pro is sold as:

Important note:
Dreame never released any firmware updates for this robot.
However, we were able to port the regular D9 firmware to it, which is a huge improvement over the stock D9 Pro experience.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

F9

The Dreame F9 is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

L10 Pro

The Dreame L10 Pro is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Z10 Pro

The Dreame Z10 Pro is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

W10

The Dreame W10 is sold as:

Rooting is fairly easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Because of its port placement, it can be a bit difficult to connect the required cables for rooting.
If you’re struggling to do that, consider removing the Lid to gain better access to the connector.

MOVA

MOVA apparently was a rather short-lived sub-brand(?) of Dreame

MOVA Z500

The MOVA Z500 is made by Dreame. It is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a 3.3v USB UART Adapter and almost no disassembly. All warranty seals stay intact.

Roborock

Roborock S5

The Roborock S5 is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Laptop. All warranty seals stay intact.

Roborock S6

The Roborock S6 is sold as:

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Roborock S6 Pure

The Roborock S6 Pure is sold as:

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Roborock S4

The Roborock S4 is sold as:

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Roborock S4 Max

The Roborock S4 Max is sold as:

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Roborock S5 Max

The Roborock S5 Max is sold as:

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.

Roborock S7

The Roborock S7 is sold as:

Important Note:
I do not own this robot. There can be unknown issues with equally unknown solutions.
Not everything might work. The available firmware might be outdated. The experience might be subpar.

Rooting requires full disassembly.
Warning:

Viomi

Viomi is a brand that uses existing robot designs with a slightly customized cloud.
They’re not a robot manufacturer.

Viomi V6

The Viomi V6 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Cecotec

Conga is a brand that uses existing robot designs with a slightly customized cloud.
They’re not a robot manufacturer.

Conga 3290

The Conga 3290 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Important note:
Because Congas use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Conga 3790

The Conga 3790 is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Important note:
Because Congas use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Proscenic

Proscenic is a brand that uses existing robot designs with a slightly customized cloud.
They’re not a robot manufacturer.

Proscenic M6 Pro

The Proscenic M6 Pro is actually a 3irobotix CRL-200S inside. It is sold as:

Important note:
Because Proscenic robots use a non-miio cloud implementation, getting them to work with Valetudo means reflashing them to a Viomi V6. That’s possible, because the hardware is exactly the same.

Rooting is pretty easy, only requiring a Linux Laptop and a micro USB cable.
It might be required to remove the battery but that can be done without touching any warranty seals.

Valetudo

Open source cloud replacement for vacuum robots enabling local-only operation

View the Project on GitHub Hypfer/Valetudo

General

Newcomer Guide Why Valetudo? Why not Valetudo? Getting Started Supported Robots Implementation overview Capabilities Overview Upgrading Rooting instructions Firmware Updates Buying supported robots

Installation

Roborock OTA

Companion Apps

Valetudo Companion (Android) Valetudo Tray Companion (Windows) Valeronoi Lovelace Valetudo Map Card I can't believe it's not Valetudo node-red-contrib-valetudo Fun & Games Other Noteworthy Projects

Integrations

MQTT Home Assistant Node-RED openHAB

Misc

FAQ Roborock, Files to backup Style Guide Troubleshooting

Development

Building and Modifying Valetudo Valetudo core concepts MQTT

Archive

Supported Dreame Devices Supported Roborock Devices Newcomer Guide Early 2021 Newcomer Guide Late 2021